fbpx
 

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer reported on Friday that the Navajo Nation now has over 100,000 individuals who are fully vaccinated for Covid-19 as of Thursday.

The first shipment of Pfzier Covid-19 vaccines arrived on the Navajo Nation on Dec. 14, 2021. Since then, the Navajo Area Indian Health Service worked aggressively with Navajo Nation officials get the vaccines into the arms of Navajo citizens. 

The Navajo Area Indian Health Service reported that 247,165 total vaccine doses have been received, 225,819 administered, which represents over 91 percent. 100,101 individuals have been fully vaccinated. 

“This is a great achievement for the Navajo people and our health care workers. Well over half of the adult population on the Navajo Nation is fully vaccinated. If you consider only the individuals who live on the Navajo Nation and receive their health care service from the Navajo Area IHS, that percentage increases to over 70 percent. Our next goal is to reach a 75 percent vaccination rate before we consider reopening our Nation to visitors, President Nez said.

The vaccination success we are seeing is thanks to our Navajo people who are receiving the vaccine to protect themselves and others. Our health care workers are doing an outstanding job. Without them, we wouldn’t be where we are today in terms of record low numbers of Covid-19 cases and lower numbers of deaths. This is a great milestone, but we have to continue informing our people and encouraging them to get vaccinated. Community immunity is our goal,” Nez continued.

Health care facilities across the Navajo Nation continue to administer Covid-19 vaccines during drive-thru events or by appointment. If you would like to receive the vaccine, please contact your health care provider for more information for your Service Unit. For more information about Covid-19 vaccines, please visit: https://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/Covid-19/Covid-19-Vaccine.

This week, President Nez and Vice President Lizer issued a proclamation recognizing May 6 – 12, 2021 as “Navajo Nation Nurses Appreciation Week,” to honor the tremendous contributions and sacrifices of frontline warriors, including nurses, CHR’s and other health care workers who continue to put themselves at risk to save lives during the Covid-19 pandemic. 

More Stories Like This

EXCLUSIVE: Special Assistant to the President on Native Affairs at the White House Libby Washburn on Biden’s First Year in Office
Smithsonian Names New Director of National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center, & the Cultural Resources Center in Maryland
Dept. of the Interior to Host Listening Sessions on Infrastructure and Planning
Tribes in Oklahoma Take to Social Media to Criticize Oklahoma Governor Stitt’s MLK Jr. Comments
Native News Weekly (January 16, 2022): D.C. Briefs

The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

This month, we’re asking our readers to help us raise $10,000 to fund our year-long journalism initiative called “The Indian Boarding School Project: A Dark Chapter in History.”  Our mission is to shine a light on the dark era of forced assimilation of native American children by the U.S. government and churches.  You’ll be able to read stories each week and join us for Livestream events to understand what the Indian Boarding School era has meant to Native Americans — and what it still means today.

This news will be provided free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts.  Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.