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Mourners surround a vehicle carrying the coffins of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani and Iraqi militia leader Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, during a funeral procession Saturday in Baghdad. Photo from NPR

We strongly believe that our country is capable of resolving the issues with Iran diplomatically.

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer released the following statement on Tuesday, January 7, 2020 on the Iran Conflict:

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez with Vice President Myron Lizer to his left. Native News Online photo by Levi Rickert

In response to aftermath of the killing of Iran Major Gen. Qassem Soleimani, our administration offers prayers for all military men and women and their families. Many of our own Diné people serve in every branch of the Armed Forces — we pray for their protection from any harm and we pray that they return home safely to their families.

We strongly believe that our country is capable of resolving the issues with Iran diplomatically. The further the situation escalates the greater the risk is for our military men and women — we should always do everything we can to avoid putting them in harm’s way.
 

Navajo people have a long and proud history of military service and there is no doubt that we helped this great country of ours in every major battle to date. We know the devastating impacts that war and military conflict can have on the lives of our men and women, especially our sons and daughters who often suffer long-term disabilities.

Our Navajo people have given their lives for this country and for our people. With this in mind, it’s imperative that the U.S. do everything within its power to bring a peaceful end to the conflict with Iran. Let us join together in prayer for the safety of our soldiers, their families, and for our country.”

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About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi "Calm Before the Storm" Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected].