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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — On Tuesday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 15 new COVID-19 positive cases for the Navajo Nation and five more deaths. The reported cases represent the further flattening of the curve on the Navajo Nation that has suffered the most among all other tribes in Indian Country from COVID-19.

The total number of deaths has reached 446 as of Tuesday. Reports indicate that 6,585 individuals have recovered from COVID-19. 78,501 people have been tested for COVID-19. The total number of COVID-19 positive cases for the Navajo Nation is 8,927.

Navajo Nation COVID-19 positive cases by Service Unit:

Chinle Service Unit: 2,198
Crownpoint Service Unit: 756
Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 641
Gallup Service Unit: 1,462
Kayenta Service Unit: 1,244
Shiprock Service Unit: 1,397
Tuba City Service Unit: 828
Winslow Service Unit: 398
* Three residences with COVID-19 positive cases are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit.

On Tuesday, the state of Arizona reported 2,107 new cases of COVID-19, while New Mexico reported 301 new cases, and Utah reported 446 new cases. The Navajo Nation will have another 57-hour weekend lockdowns beginning on Friday, July 31 at 8:00 p.m. until Monday, Aug. 3 at 5:00 a.m. All businesses on the Navajo Nation will remain closed for the duration of the weekend lockdown.

“It’s because of the Navajo people that our Nation is seeing a consistent flattening of the curve in terms of new COVID-19 cases. The people are listening to the health care experts when they are told to stay home, wear masks, social distance, wash hands, and avoid large gatherings. We only have 15 new cases reported today, but we have to remain diligent and keeping fighting the virus together,” said Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez.

The Department of Health and the Health Command Operations Center is also preparing for the upcoming winter flu season. They have also created a vaccination group to develop plans securing and distributing a vaccine for COVID-19 once one is proven to be safe and made available.

To Donate to the Navajo Nation

 The official webpage for donations to the Navajo Nation, which has further details on how to support  the Nation’s Dikos Ntsaaígíí-19 (COVID-19) efforts is:  undefined.

For More Information

For more information including reports, helpful prevention tips, and more resources, please visit the Navajo Department of Health’s COVID-19 website. To contact the main Navajo Health Command Operations Center, please call (928) 871-7014

For up to date information on impact the coronavirus pandemic is having in the United States and around the world, visit the Worldometers website.

For up-to-date information about COVID-19, Native News Online encourages you to go to Indian Health Service’s COVID-19 webpage.

The Nez-Lizer Administration is also working with businesses to setup food donation drop-off sites at grocery stores to allow Navajo Nation residents to contribute non-perishable food items, which will be made available to Navajo people and others living in the Phoenix area as a way to give back to our relatives and friends of the Navajo Nation who graciously donated essential items to the Navajo Nation. 

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