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On this week's Native Bidaské (Spotlight) on Friday, Native News Online chatted with Native News Online’s own, Jenna Kunze. The discussion was centered around Jenna’s work covering the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues held in New York. 

Jenna is Native News Online’s senior reporter and has been covering the largest annual gathering of Indigenous People from around the world for two weeks. 

As she is sitting outside the main conference room surrounded by delegates from all over the world, she describes what the last two weeks have been like. 

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“There has been so much content on the floor,” she says. “One of the most interesting things for me has been to see the throughline that all of these Indigenous Peoples’ organizations have come to the UN from all over the world saying a lot of the same things. They’re saying that their country, despite what the members on the other side of the room will tell you, that they're not doing a thorough enough job of implementing the United Nations Declaration of Right of Indigenous Peoples.” 

Pacific Islanders, Indigenous Siberians, Taino, Crimean Tatars, Indigenous North Americans, and even more are all agreed on each of their countries' lack of upholding their rights as Indigenous peoples. Specifically, they are all in consensus about their countries’ lack of upholding their right as Indigenous peoples to say “no” when the government asks for their land. 

Watch the whole interview below:

 

Native Bidaské, Native News Online’s weekly spotlight on the people making news and leading change in Indian Country is live streamed every Friday at 12 noon - EDT. Check Native News Online's social media channels for upcoming guests.

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You’re reading the first draft of history. 

November is  Native American Heritage Month in the United States. We feel like every month — and every day — is a reason for celebrating Native Americans and our heritage. That’s what we try to do here at Native News Online, with stories each day that celebrate, inform and uplift American Indian and Alaska Native people. Over the past year or so, we have been especially busy with three important reporting projects that are having an impact across Indian Country:

  • Indian Boarding Schools. We’ve reported and published more than 150 stories and special live stream video events to help shine a light on the dark era of boarding schools — and help create momentum for change.
  • Native Health Desk. Launched in January, this reporting initiative was created to heighten awareness of Native American health inequities and spotlight pockets of progress in Indian Country. So far we’ve reported and published nearly 120 stories and launched a monthly health newsletter that reaches more than 23,000 readers.  
  • Native Bidaske. In March, we launched this live stream interview program to highlight the work of Native Americans who are making news and leading change in Indian Country.  We have hosted guests from the federal government and Native rights advocates as well as Indigenous actors, comedians, journalists and models.   

We hope you will join us in celebrating Native American heritage and history this November and invite you to consider the old adage that “Journalism is the first draft of history.” If you appreciate the voice Native News Online gives to Native American people, we hope you will support our work with a donation so we can build our newsroom and continue to amplify Native voices and Native perspectives.

Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Neely Bardwell
Author: Neely BardwellEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Neely Bardwell (descendant of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indian) is a staff reporter for Native News Online. Bardwell is also a student at Michigan State University where she is majoring in policy and minoring in Native American studies.