fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

One more racist's name has been removed from a geographic location. The U.S. Board on Geographic Names officially renamed Mount Evans to Mount Blue Sky during the Council of Geographic Names Authorities conference Friday afternoon.

The name change happened after two nation-to-nation consultations with tribal leaders, according to a press release issued Friday by the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Tribal leaders advocated for the name change because Mt. Evans was named after John Evans, who served as territorial governor of Colorado from 1862 to 1865. Evan was closely linked to the Sand Creek Massacre. Native Americans found the name associated with the moutain offensive. 

In June 1864, Evans ordered all “friendly Indians of the plains” to relocate to “places of safety.” The next month, Evans issued a proclamation allowing Coloradans to “kill and destroy” any hostile Indian.

Never miss Indian Country’s biggest stories and breaking news. Sign up to get our reporting sent straight to your inbox every weekday morning. 

On November 29, 1864, U.S. soldiers attacked an encampment of approximately 750 Native people. As they fled, many were wounded and killed. Well over half of the 230 dead were women and children.

“The process undertaken by the Board on Geographic Names is an important part of the federal government’s commitments to Tribes and ensuring that all voices are heardNaN,” Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Water and Science Michael Brain. “Names matter. How we identify our public lands is an important opportunity to be inclusive and welcoming, and to make a lasting impact for future generations.”

Mount Evans is located in Clear Creek County and along the boundary of the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and the Pike and San Isabel National Forests and in Mount Evans Wilderness. At an elevation of approximately 14,258 

Mount Blue Sky is located in Clear Creek County and along the boundary of the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and the Pike and San Isabel National Forests and in Mount Evans Wilderness. At an elevation of approximately 14,258.

More Stories Like This

Read Former President Trump's Acceptance Speech
Chief Standing Bear Courage Prize Committee Announces U.S. District Court Judge Diane Humetewa as 2024 Prize Recipient
Vice President Kamala Harris Speaks in Michigan about Women's Rights
Trump’s New Running Mate, J.D. Vance, Has History of Anti-Indigenous Beliefs
Rep. Lauren Boebert Thinks She Should be the Next Interior Secretary If Trump is Elected

Join us in observing 100 years of Native American citizenship. On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, granting Native Americans US citizenship, a pivotal moment in their quest for equality. This year marks its centennial, inspiring our special project, "Heritage Unbound: Native American Citizenship at 100," observing their journey with stories of resilience, struggle, and triumph. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive.

About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi "Calm Before the Storm" Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected].