fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

Tags

SEATTLE — The FBI’s Seattle Field Office is offering a $10,000 reward for information relating to the disappearance of Mary Davis Johnson (Tulalip) who has not been seen since Nov. 25, 2020.

Johnson was last seen walking on the Tulalip Indian Reservation, near Marysville, Wash. Johnson was reportedly walking to a friend’s house and never arrived.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

She was reported missing by her ex-husband on Dec. 9, 2020.

Johnson is described as 5-foot-6, 115 pounds, with a sunburst-type tattoo on her upper right arm. She was 39 years old when she disappeared.  

The FBI, which is working with the Tulalip Tribal Police on the investigation, is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of person(s) responsible for Johnson’s disappearance. 

In a report released in June 2019 by the Urban Indian Health Institute, a division of the Seattle Indian Health Board, Washington state ranked second in the nation for cases of missing Indigenous women. The city of Seattle ranked first in the nation for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

Anyone with information about the whereabouts of Johnson should call the FBI Seattle Field Office at 206-622-0460 or go to tips.fbi.gov.

Johnson's story was shared on TULALIP TV, a cable channel providing programming to Native households and subscribers to Tulalip Broadband.  To view, watch below: 

SOURCE: tiʔiɫ ʔəsx̌ʷiĺ (The Missing): Mary Davis Johnson from TULALIP TV on Vimeo.

More Stories Like This

President Biden's Juneteenth Day Proclamation
Railway Ordered to Pay Washington Tribe $400M
Gathering Set to Honor White Buffalo Born in Yellowstone National Park for June 26th
Native News Weekly (June 16, 2024): D.C. Briefs
25th Navajo Nation Council Honors the Service of All Women Veterans

Join us in celebrating 100 years of Native citizenship. On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, granting Native Americans US citizenship, a pivotal moment in their quest for equality. This year marks its centennial, inspiring our special project, "Heritage Unbound: Native American Citizenship at 100," celebrating their journey with stories of resilience, struggle, and triumph. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected].