fbpx
 
Mari Hulbutta, a star student and Citizen of the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma, graduated May 20 from Columbia Law School.

Mari Hulbutta, a star student and Citizen of the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma, graduated May 20 from Columbia Law School. Hulbutta grew up in a suburb just north of Oklahoma City, and has known for years she was destined for a career in law. “I always knew law was in the backdrop,” she said in a video interview on Columbia Law School’s website. “I became aware of this idea throughout Indian country of a ‘briefcase warrior,’ which is the modern-day warrior that a lot of Native people pursue whenever they pursue a career in law.” 

After graduation, Hulbutta said she will join Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton intellectual property litigation practice group in Century City, Calif., as an associate. She will also work with the firm’s Native American law practice group.

In 2013, as an undergrad, she was awarded the UDALL Congressional Award for Native American students. The award gave her the opportunity to meet with Native People who held positions of power, governing the relationships with the federal government and tribes. Through this opportunity she met former Chickasaw Nation Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel and Assistant Chief of the Seminole Nation Lewis J. Johnson.

During Hulbutta’s time in Columbia, she was closely engaged with the Native American Law Student Association, serving as its president. According to the Chickasaw Times, in March 2019, she guided a group of classmates through a week of service and cultural awareness in Chickasaw Country. 

In her Chickasaw Times interview, Hulbutta said, “It’s been a real treat to be able to bring students from across the United State and even from around the world to the Chickasaw Nation.”

Hulbutta also worked alongside Bernard Harcourt, a Columbia Law professor of political science, on research surrounding the Standing Rock protests. Through that, she helped draft briefs on behalf of Native Americans and non-Natives who were impacted by unconstitutional actions.

More Stories Like This

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland Visits the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
History Was Made as Nicole Aunapu Mann Became the First Native American Woman Launched into Space
Tribal Business News Round Up: Oct. 4
Hurricane Ian Slams Southwest Florida, But Mostly Spares Reservations
Department of the Interior Announces South Dakota Third Stop on Road to Healing Tour

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Author: Mikayla SteeleEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.