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By Rich Tupica

In an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19, countless organizations across Indian Country have cancelled their in-person events for the foreseeable future—but some are keeping the spirit alive by utilizing live streams for social gatherings. Some are ongoing, some are one-time affairs. Here are just a few broadcasts to check out while you’re stuck at home.  We’ll add to this list over the coming days.

Social Distance Powwow Facebook group attracts over 60,000A new Facebook group, Social Distance Powwow, quickly garnered a following of more than 66,700 people following the aftermath of COVID-19. And that number is rapidly growing. According to its administrators, the group is an “online powwow” started to support the many vendors, dancers and singers who’ve been affected by the virus shutdown. The platform allows everyone to share their “Creator given talents and be supported” and encourages everyone to “spread love and positivity.”

Back on March 21-22, the group hosted a “Live From Your Own Homes” Powwow, where people logged on and streamed their own drum songs, traditional songs and dances.

The next online event is already in the works, according to administrator Whitney Rencountre, who posted this in the group yesterday: “We’ve reached over 60,000 group members here on the Social Distance Powwow Page! Because of this, we’re happy to announce that we’ll be bringing you all together this Saturday, March 28, 2020 for another Social Distance Powwow! Details coming soon!”

To get in on the fun, and post your videos, go here to join.

#SHAREHEALING (MARCH 27)

One of these groups, Association on American Indian Affairs, goes live Friday, March 27 with #SHAREHEALING, a live stream that encourages everyone to “come together—from our homes or a quiet place with physical distance from others—to share 20 minutes in prayer, good thoughts and unity of spirit.”

For those wanting to tune in, here are the times by region: 5 p.m. Eastern, 4 p.m. Mountain, 3 p.m. Central, 2 p.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. Alaska and 11 a.m. Hawaii time.

The association is also asking people to reach out to them during these challenging times. A recent statement asked their followers to: “Please share, if it is appropriate, what you are doing to pray, meditate, or share healing thoughts on social media by posting with #ShareHealing and by tagging us on [on social media] … Let us join together to #ShareHealing [and] to send thoughts of healing and health during this uneasy and fearful time.”

For information on how to view #SHAREHEALING, follow them on Facebook, here.

Looking for laughs? Don Burnstick delivers While people are glued to their television’s watching scary ’round-the-clock pandemic-news coverage, Canadian stand-up comedian Don Burnstick hopes to make a few people smile. The veteran funnyman goes live this evening (March 24) at 7 p.m. Mountain Time. The stream, dubbed Healing with Laughter 2, features his distinct brand of comedy. Burnstick is a Cree from the Alexander First Nation located outside of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

To view the show tonight, simply follow him on Facebook by clicking here. If you missed it live, you can watch anytime by browsing his Facebook videos, which are archived here.

If you’d like to sample Healing With Laughter 1, which he posted last week, click here.

If you’re streaming an event or performance, please let us know and we’ll share it with the Native News Online.  Email [email protected] or post on our Facebook page.

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About The Author
Author: Rich TupicaEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.