fbpx
 
Breaking News

FULTON, Mich. — On Sunday night, the Nottawaseppi Huron Potawatomi tribal council and executive team of the Firekeppers Casino Hotel decided to temporary close the casino due to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic threat.

Located in Battle Creek, Mich., Firekeepers will close on Monday, March 16 at 3 a.m. No date reopening date was specified. Please check the Firekeepers website for updates.

Here is the statement that was posted on Firekeepers' Facebook page on Sunday evening:

"The primary focus from the leadership of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi and the executive team at FireKeepers Casino Hotel is to protect the health and safety of our guests and Team Members as we face the spread of COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Effective March 16, 2020, at 3 a.m., FireKeepers Casino Hotel will close in an effort to control the spread of the virus.

We are taking this action as responsible business leaders within the Michigan community and as one of the largest employers in the region. We will continue to monitor and comply with all orders, directives, instructions and/or recommendations made by government agencies and will advise guests once a reopen date has been established.

 

Stay up to date regarding updates to our business status by following us on social media and check in regularly at www.firekeeperscasino.com. During the closure, all scheduled entertainment is postponed. Please check our website for details about specific shows and ticket refunds. Also, during the closure, all marketing events, promotions and offers are canceled.

Thank you for being a valued guest of FireKeepers Casino Hotel and we look forward to bringing you the opportunity to Get Your Vegas On again soon. Please be well and follow all CDC best practices for protecting health during this pandemic."

 

More Stories Like This

EXCLUSIVE: Special Assistant to the President on Native Affairs at the White House Libby Washburn on Biden’s First Year in Office
Smithsonian Names New Director of National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center, & the Cultural Resources Center in Maryland
Dept. of the Interior to Host Listening Sessions on Infrastructure and Planning
Tribes in Oklahoma Take to Social Media to Criticize Oklahoma Governor Stitt’s MLK Jr. Comments
Native News Weekly (January 16, 2022): D.C. Briefs

The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

This month, we’re asking our readers to help us raise $10,000 to fund our year-long journalism initiative called “The Indian Boarding School Project: A Dark Chapter in History.”  Our mission is to shine a light on the dark era of forced assimilation of native American children by the U.S. government and churches.  You’ll be able to read stories each week and join us for Livestream events to understand what the Indian Boarding School era has meant to Native Americans — and what it still means today.

This news will be provided free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts.  Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.