WINDOW ROCK  On Wednesday, Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer signed a proclamation ordering all flags on the Navajo Nation to be flown at half-staff on June 6 in honor and remembrance of Navajo Code Talker William Tully Brown, who passed away on June 3 at the age of 96 in Winslow, Arizona.

“The Navajo Nation was saddened to hear of the passing of another brave and selfless Diné warrior. The Nation is grateful for Code Talker Brown’s sacrifices and those of his family and community, to defend the freedom and liberty of our Nation and country,” said President Nez.

Flags lowered to half-staff

ode Talker Brown was born on Oct. 30, 1922 in Black Mountain, Ariz, located approximately five-miles north of Tselani/Cottonwood Chapter. Brown was Tó’aheedlííníí (The Water Flow Together Clan) and born for Tł’ááahchí’i (The Red Bottom People Clan).

In 1944, Brown enlisted with the Marine Corps and was honorably discharged in 1946. He received the American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, Navy Occupation Service Medal, World War II Victory Medal, and Honorable Service Label Button.

“The Navajo Nation mourns for the loss of our warriors, who utilized our sacred Navajo language to protect the Nation and country during World War II. We ask all of our people throughout the Navajo Nation and beyond to join us on June 6 in saying a prayer for our beloved Code Talker and to honor his life by lowering our flags across Navajo land,” said Vice President Lizer.

Brown is the third Navajo Code Talker to pass away since the month of May.

The viewing will be held on Thursday, June 6 at 8:00 a.m. at the Church of Latter-day Saints Chapel in St. Michaels, Ariz., followed by a funeral service at 10:00 a.m. at Fort Defiance Veterans Memorial Cemetery. A reception will follow at the Church of Latter-day Saints Chapel in St. Michaels, Ariz.

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Author: Native News Online Staff