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ISABELLA INDIAN RESERVATION — First Lady Jill Biden and U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy on Sunday afternoon visited the Ziibiwing Center and hold a listening session focused on youth mental health with citizens of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe on the Isabella Indian Reservation in Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Dr. Biden and Dr. Vivek participated in a panel discussion on the success of a $9 million five-year grant project, entitled Project AWARE, from the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe received the grant in April 2019 and is now in the third year of Project AWARE.

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It was the second visit to an Indian reservation for Dr. Biden since becoming first lady in January. She visited the Navajo Nation in late April. 

Look for additional article on Native News Online on Monday.

First Lady Jill Biden listening intently to student discuss Project AWARE. (Photo/Native News Online)
Assistant Secretary of the Interior - Indian Affairs Bryan Newland (Photo/Native News Online)
Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Education Director Melissa Isaac (Photo/Native News Online)
Saginaw Chippewa dancers (Photo/Native News Online)
David Meshkowzii, parent on the panel. (Photo/Native News Online)
First Lady Jill Biden was welcomed to the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe by Chief Tim Davis. (Photo/Native News Online)
First Lady Jill Biden presented a blanket with the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe's logo on it by the tribal council. (Photo/Native News Online)

 

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About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi "Calm Before the Storm" Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected].