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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – Even as the new Covid-19 positive cases have slowed down during the past two weeks, the total number of deaths from Covid-19 stands at 1,201 as of Sunday. There were three more deaths reported on Sunday. The death toll surpassed 1,200 in less than a year. 

The Navajo Nation began reporting its COVID-19 data on March 17, 2020. 

On Sunday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service reported 16,159 individuals have recovered from Covid-19, and 248,359 Covid-19 tests have been administered. The total number of positive Covid-19 cases is now 29,866, including two delayed reported cases.

Navajo Nation Covid-19 positive cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 5,495
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 2,858
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 3,558
  • Gallup Service Unit: 4,724
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 2,639
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 5,012
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 3,620
  • Winslow Service Unit: 1,942

* 18 residences with Covid-19 positive cases are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit.

On Sunday, the state of Arizona reported 1,335 new cases, Utah reported 412, and New Mexico reported 183 new cases. The Navajo Nation’s daily curfew remains in effect from 9:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. (MST) seven days a week. The Navajo Department of Health issued Public Health Emergency Order No. 2021-04, continuing the Navajo Nation’s stay-at-home order and daily curfew from 9:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. (MST), seven days a week. The latest order is in effect until March 15 at 5:00 a.m. (MST). 

“Mutations or variants of the Covid-19 virus continue to spread and we won’t know the extent of the impacts for some time. Until we know, it’s very important that we continue to take all precautions to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe and healthy. With some states lifting safety measures including the Governor of Arizona, the safest place to be is at home here on the Navajo Nation. Please be safe and continue to pray for our health care workers, frontline warriors, and all of our Navajo people. Continue to stay home as much as possible, wear one or two masks in public, avoid large in-person gatherings, practice social distancing, and wash your hands often with soap and warm water,” Navajo Nation President Nez said.

Health care facilities across the Navajo Nation continue to administer Covid-19 vaccines during drive-thru events or by appointment. If you would like to receive the vaccine, please contact your health care provider for more information for your Service Unit. 

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of Covid-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's Covid-19 website: http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/Covid-19. For Covid-19 related questions and information, call (928) 871-7014. 

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