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Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. will visit Orlando, Florida, along with other tribal leaders for a community gathering of enrolled Cherokee Nation citizens on Saturday, Feb. 1.

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — As part of an ongoing outreach effort to reach at-large tribal citizens, Cherokee Nation Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr. and other tribal leaders will visit Orlando, Fla. this Saturday. 

There are some 2,500 registered Cherokee Nation citizens living in Florida.

“It is important for the tribe to engage with Cherokee citizens living outside of our 14-county jurisdiction in Oklahoma, providing some of the same benefits enrolled tribal citizens have in Oklahoma such as cultural enrichment activities and photo ID citizenship cards,” Chief Hoskin said. “By organizing at-large community events like this, we are ensuring we do our part in keeping strong connections with our Cherokee at-large brothers and sisters.”

WHAT: At-large Cherokee Florida Community Meeting

WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

WHERE: Englewood Neighborhood Center, 6123 La Costa Drive, Orlando, Florida

Informational booths on Cherokee Nation programs and services, cultural presentations and demonstrations, as well as remarks from Chief Hoskin and at-large Tribal Councilors Mary Baker Shaw and Julia Coates will be part of the program.

The Cherokee Nation Registration department will also be on hand to issue photo ID citizenship cards for tribal citizens who have already enrolled. A replacement card can be printed for a $5 fee.

To learn more about programs and services available to at-large Cherokee Nation citizens, visit http://cherokeesatlarge.org. For more information on the Orlando-area community event, follow Cherokee Nation Community & Cultural Outreach on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/CNCCO or call 918-207-4963. 

For more information on the photo ID citizenship cards, call Cherokee Nation Registration at 918-458-6980 or email [email protected].

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