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Iroquois women in upstate New York, 1915

With the last day of Women’s History Month upon us, all are welcome to check out Women Win the Vote, the Centennial Gazette publication produced by the National Women’s History Alliance.

Native American women, who endured a long fight for voting rights in the United States, are covered on pages 7, 22 and 30. The full edition is available to read for free HERE. While non-Native American women won the right to vote in 1920, via the 19th Amendment, both Native women and men were not granted the right to vote in all 50 states until 1962—even after Native Americans had won U.S. citizenship in 1924, following The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924, also known as the Snyder Act. For further Women’s History Month reading, earlier this month, Biography published a nice breakdown of amazing women, check it out here: 5 Powerful and Influential Native American Women.

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About The Author
Author: Rich Tupica