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Indigneous photographers under 30 years old are invited to submit their images depicting a theme of climate change and climate action for the World Intellectual Property Organization photography contest.

Photographs should show the impact of climate change on a specific community, or Indigeous adaptation or mitigation to the impacts of climate change.

“Participation is meant to encourage Indigenous peoples and local community youth to express themselves on this issue of immense global significance,” the WIPO press release reads.

Help us tell Native stories that get overlooked by other media.

The first place winner will receive photography equipment valued at $3,500. Second and third place winners will receive equipment worth $2,500 and $1,500, respectively.

Eligible participants must be under 30 years old, and a member of an Indgienous community.

Five judges will select winning photographs based on the following criteria: adherence to theme, expression of theme, overall impact, originality, creativity, artistic expression, personal expression, and visual appeal.

The deadline for submissions is January 22. Winning participants will be notified by email and the official announcement of the winners will follow on April 22.

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The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

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