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With 80 new COVID-19 cases reported on the Navajo Nation on Wednesday, the nation’s largest reservation surpassed 37,000 cases since COVID cases were first reported on March 17, 2020.

The Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 80 new COVID-19 cases for the Navajo Nation and no recent deaths. The total number of deaths remains 1,487.

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“We are in this together and we need more of our people to get vaccinated to reduce the spread of COVID-19," Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said.

Health care facilities across the Navajo Nation continue to administer COVID-19 vaccines. If you would like to receive one of the COVID-19 vaccines, please contact your health care provider and schedule an appointment.

“COVID-19 vaccines have now been approved by the FDA and CDC, to allow the vaccines to be administered to five-to-11-year-old individuals. This is a significant development for families who have been waiting for the vaccines to become available for their children. With many of our students back in the classrooms, we strongly encourage all families to get their children vaccinated,” Nez said.

The vaccines should be available at all health care facilities on the Navajo Nation in the next few days. Please contact your health care provider about vaccination events or to setup an appointment.

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of COVID-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's COVID-19 website: http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19. For COVID-19 related questions and information, call (928) 871-7014. 

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The Native News Health Desk is made possible by a generous grant from the National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation as well as sponsorship support from RxDestroyer, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and the American Dental Association. This grant funding and sponsorship support have no effect on editorial consideration in Native News Online.