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WASHINGTON — You will lose the hour of sleep you gained last fall overnight on Sunday, March 8, 2020 at 2:00 a.m.  Tt is time to “spring forward” with daylight saving time in most places across the United States.

Most states comply with daylight saving time change. However, the state of Arizona does not, except for the Navajo Indian Reservation where a large portion of it is located. The only other state in the country that does not comply with daylight saving time is Hawaii.

With the advent of technology, such as computers, smart phones, and tablets, many clocks will self-adjust to daylight saving time at 2:00 a.m. However, other clocks and watches will still need to be changed.

The time will fall back to standard time at 2:00 a.m., November 1, 2020 when you can regain the hour of sleep you lose overnight.

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