fbpx
 
The Santa Fe Indian Market is going virtual for its 2020 event. (courtesy photo)

SANTE FE — While the Santa Fe Indian Market (SWAIA) was cancelled due to COVID 19, the colossal Native arts event is moving ahead online.

According to a release from SWAIA’s Kimberly Peone, the event has been revamped into a Virtual Indian Market following a partnership with Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF), a Santa Fe-based nonprofit.

“SWAIA has hired [CHF] to serve as project manager for the Virtual Market, and provide us with the support and expertise that comes with their decades of experience,” Peone said. “We feel the partnership is exactly what SWAIA needs as we explore new territory. [We] see this as an opportunity to expand our mission to serve artists and the art community in a broader way.” According to the SWAIA release, the virtual platform will accommodate more artists than the physical market, which is constrained by limited space in downtown Santa Fe. With this new virtual setup, artists who were juried in in 2020, but on the waitlist for a booth, will now have a chance to participate. Other fresh programming on the website will include a fashion show, virtual exhibits and more.

SWAIA, which is approaching its centennial year, has a rich history in supporting Native arts. First launched in 1922, today the annual market attracts more than 115,000 people and generates over $160 million dollars in revenues for the state and region.

More Stories Like This

Leaders Respond to Federal Indian Boarding School Investigative Report, Call it 'Monumental'
Native News Weekly (May 15, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Native Bidaské (Spotlight) with Carlisle Indian School Project Leader Gwen Carr
Indigenous Women on Roe v. Wade
Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding Schools Bill Advocated for in Washington, D.C.

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Author: Rich TupicaEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.