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Ryan Reynolds & Paul McCartney

WALPOLE ISLAND — A First Nation with about 5,000 band members is seeking to remove the names of Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds and legendary ex-Beatle Paul McCartney from its slate of candidates for chief after community members nominated the two.

Walpole Island First Nation in southwestern Ontario can elect non-Indigenous people as leaders under the Indian Act, James Jenkins, Walpole Island’s director of operations, told CBC News.

Walpole Island tribal officeWalpole Island First Nation tribal office - Courtesy photo

The two celebrities have no known ties to Walpole Island, and had their names placed on the ballot for the First Nation’s Sept. 19 election. Community officials have reportedly reached out to both but have not heard back. Including the two celebrities, there are 12 nominations for chief. 

Walpole Island ballotWalpole Island First Nation election ballot as of Wednesday, Aug. 12

Seeking guidance on how the situation should be handled, Jenkins reached out to Indigenous Services Canada. After consultation, it was decided if the two celebrities have not responded by 4 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 13, their names will be removed from the ballot.

The current incumbent, Chief Dan Miskokowmon, is running for reelection. He is seeking his third consecutive two-year term. Miskokowmon served as chief during the 1990s and early 2000s.

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Author: Native News Online Staff