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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — The Navajo Nation reported 74 new cases of Covid-19 on Friday, which brings the total of cases of 34,071 since the first Covid-19 case was reported on the nation’s largest Indian reservation on March 17, 2020.

The total number of deaths remains 1,447. The report indicates that 32,203 individuals have recovered from Covid-19. 339,252 Covid-19 tests have been administered.

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez urged Navajo citizens to exercise caution when they are out in the public.

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“It is the start of a new month and many of our elders are receiving Social Security and other benefits. We strongly urge all of our people to be very cautious in public, wear a mask or two, and do your best to practice social distancing. We are still in the midst of a pandemic and Covid-19 continues to be a threat to everyone, especially in cities and regions off of the Navajo Nation. The safest place to be is at home here on the Navajo Nation. Please be cautious and get fully vaccinated if you haven’t already," Nez said.

Health care facilities across the Navajo Nation continue to administer Covid-19 vaccines. If you would like to receive one of the Covid-19 vaccines, please contact your health care provider and schedule an appointment.

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of Covid-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's Covid-19 website: http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/Covid-19. For Covid-19 related questions and information, call (928) 871-7014. 

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