fbpx
 

On this week’s Native Bidaské (Spotlight), Chef Sean Sherman joined Native News Online staff for a discussion about his work in revitalizing Indigenous food systems as a Native chef, as well as the harmful legacy of residential and Indian boarding schools. 

Sherman is nationally and internationally renowned in the Indigenous food culinary movements. He is a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Tribe and was born and raised in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. 

His first cookbook, The Sioux Chef’s Indiegnous Kitchen received the James Beard Award for Best American Cookbook.

In 2021, Sean Sherman and his business partner Dana Thompson opened Owamni by the Sioux Chef, Minnesota’s first full service Indigenous restaurant. 

Never miss Indian Country’s biggest stories and breaking news. Sign up to get our reporting sent straight to your inbox every weekday morning. 

Sherman’s primary focus is revitalizing Indigenous food systems by encouraging the decolonization of our diet and the ingredients we use in our cooking. 

“​​We don't have to recreate the past, but it's important to start by identifying what are our modern Indigenous food items and creating a modern Indigenous pantry, and then adding creativity,” he said.

Watch the whole interview here.




More Stories Like This

Native News Weekly (October 2, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Saint Regis Mohawk Tribal Citizen, Justice Mark Montour,  Appointed State Appellate Court Justice
Hundreds Gather in St. Paul for Boarding School Survivors Candlelight Vigil
Walk to Freedom for Leonard Peltier Halfway to Washington
President Biden Welcomes a “Conversation” about Atlanta Braves’s Name and the Infamous Tomahawk Chop

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Neely Bardwell
Author: Neely BardwellEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Neely Bardwell (descendant of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indian) is a staff reporter for Native News Online. Bardwell is also a student at Michigan State University where she is majoring in policy and minoring in Native American studies.