fbpx
 
The Barcid Foundation is now accepting applications for its third Native American Feature Film Writers Lab. (courtesy image)

LOS ANGELES For aspiring Natives looking to make it big in Hollywood, a new opportunity was just announced by the The Barcid Foundation that may offer a big break. The foundation is now accepting applications for the third Native American Feature Film Writers Lab, a 10-week program taking place online August-October 2020. Five Native American applicants will be selected to participate in the program. The lab will consist of daily workshops with an established screenwriter and peer workshopping sessions. Additionally, participants will attend a series of events and screenings that will expose them to the entertainment industry. The purpose of the lab is to develop the skills of the writers and prepare them for employment in the industry. The early deadline to apply is June 3, 2020. The regular deadline is June 17, Late deadline July 1, 2020. For more information or to submit, visit.

According to a release from the foundation, this program is for seasoned writers capable of writing a feature-length script. The selected participants are expected to complete at least one script by the end of session. At the end of course participants will showcase their work at the 14th Annual LA Skin Fest in November.

Among the high profile sponsors for this program are Comcast, NBCUniversal, Walt Disney Studios, Cherokee Nation Film Office and Sony Pictures Entertainment. “We are thrilled to support another group of Native American writers for this year’s feature film writer’s lab,” said Barcid Foundation Programs Director Patricia Gomes. “Each individual selected will express new, bold and diverse voices as well as provide a powerful vision as screenwriters.” The lab was created in accordance with the Barcid Foundation’s mission to improve media portrayals of Native Americans and to increase the number of Native Americans employed in all facets of the media industry.

According to the 2016 Writers Guild of America report, Native Americans replaced Latinos as the most underrepresented minority group among writers in the film sector. 

More Stories Like This

EXCLUSIVE: Deb Haaland Q&A on Road to Healing Tour Progress
September 20 is National Voter Registration Day: Native Organizations Team Up to Increase Native Youth Voter Engagement
Tribal Business News Round-Up: Sept. 19
Native American Election Forum in Atlanta to Attract Sen. Raphael Warnock & Stacey Abrams
WATCH: Native Bidaské with Four Directions' OJ Seamans, Sr. on the Native Vote

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Author: Mikayla SteeleEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.