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Katelyn Kelley captured by camera shortly before she disappeared on the Menominee Indian Reservation.

KESHENA, Wisc. — The Menominee Tribal Police Department is asking for public assistance in locating a 22-year-old Native American woman who has been missing since last Tuesday, June 16.

Katelyn L. Kelley was last seen walking on the Menominee Indian Reservation at about 10:30 p.m. in the area of County Highway VV (East) and Silver Canoe Road. She was walking on the highway towards the village of Keshena. Kelley was wearing a grey t-shirt, black swimsuit top, blue jean shorts and black flip-flops.

Kelley is described as being Native American, 5’2” tall, weighing 140 lbs. with brown eyes and brown hair.

Katelyn L. Kelley has been missing from the Menominee Indian Reservation since Tuesday, June 16, 2020.

Kelley’s family reported her missing on Thursday, June 18 and say it is highly unusual for her to not check in with family for this long of time.

The Menominee Police Department continues to investigate and search for Kelley. The department has followed up on numerous tips about her whereabouts but have not resulted in locating her.

Searches by law enforcement and several Menominee tribal entities are ongoing on the Menominee Indian Reservation in central Wisconsin. Personnel from the Menominee Tribal Police Department, Menominee Tribal Conservation Department, Menominee Tribal Enterprises, Menominee Tribal Emergency Management, Great Lakes Search,  and Rescue K-9 Inc. assisted in these searches.

The Menominee Tribal Police Department asks that anyone with information about Kelley’s whereabouts, please contact their offices at 715-799-3881. Information received will be kept anonymous upon request.

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