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Oakland, California-David Michael Karabelinkoff and allies are silk screening bandannas and shawls for Murdered and Missing Indigenous Woman in Oakland, California. They are creating these works of art at the Greenpeace Warehouse in Oakland.

Under the Obama Administration a lot of resources were put into MMIW. The 2016 Excellence in Journalism Conference, covering Domestic Violence Against Native Women, found Native women suffer from violence at a rate two and a half times greater than that of any other population in the United States. (http://www.niwrc.org/resources/journalist-resources-covering-domestic-violence-against-native-women)

Bernadette Smith, Pomo, from Manchester Point Arena reservation, was asked why she was making bandannas and Shawls and she replied, "My sister was murdered in her home on my home reservation on Nov. 19, 2017, it is important to me to raise awareness of the missing and murdered indigenous woman not only because it effects me personally, but because I am a woman."

NormPomoOhlone 600x450Carla Marie Munoz, Rumsen Ohlone and Bernadette Smith Manchester Pomo singing with clappers, Norm Sands working as usual.

Sponsors:

The Red Women Rising Project is dedicated to uplifting the voices of Urban Indian survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault through increasing awareness around Urban Indian women’s domestic violence issues and enhancing survivors' access to domestic violence services. This project also aims to enhance provider capacity to care for Native American survivors of abuse by providing access to culturally-responsive resources and training opportunities.
California Consortium for Urban Indian Health (CCUIH), April McGill & Montana Weekes engages in a diverse range of projects and public awareness campaigns aimed at optimizing health care delivery at Urban Indian clinics and raising consciousness surrounding health issues affecting Urban Indian communities

DavidSolnitedit 1 450x600David Solnit

DavidKedit 450x600David Karabelnikoff

NormPaula Edited 600x450

 

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