fbpx
 
Courtesy photo

PRIOR LAKE, Minn. — The Fertile Ground Policy Innovation Fund announced it has awarded more than $500,000 in grants to Native-led organizations and tribes.

Administered by the First Nations Development Institute, the seven grants will support American Indian efforts aimed at advancing new policies and innovative policy-making approaches that benefit nutrition and health.

These new grants’ work will range from the development of fundamental food codes to the groundbreaking Rights of Manoomin—legal rights for wild rice.

Grant recipients include:

  • American Indian Community Housing Organization (Duluth, Minnesota)
  • Blackfeet Tribe (Browning, Montana)
  • Chugach Regional Resources Commission (Anchorage, Alaska)
  • Lhaq’Temish Foundation (Bellingham, Washington)
  • Niibi Center (Waubun, Minnesota)
  • Tribal Nations Research Group (Belcourt, North Dakota)
  • Yurok Tribe (Klamath, California)

Learn more about the specific projects funded here.

The Policy Innovation Fund is part of the Fertile Ground Advocacy Campaign, a $1.6 million funding initiative to support American Indian nutrition and health advocacy.

The campaign is made possible through generous funding from Seeds of Native Health, a $11 million philanthropic effort of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community to improve Native nutrition, and the American Heart Association, a global force for longer, healthier lives, and its Voices for Healthy Kids initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

As the Policy Innovation Fund's re-granting partner, the First Nations Development Institute is responsible for grant administration. To support the success of grantees, the American Indian Cancer Foundation will provide technical assistance to the policy change campaigns.

More Stories Like This

Native News Weekly (January 16, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes to Host Annual "Would Jesus Eat Frybread?" Conference
Navajo Nation President Addresses Arizona State Legislature on Issues Facing Navajo People
Hundreds Gather for Clyde Bellecourt’s Funeral Services in Minneapolis
Triple Homicide on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

This month, we’re asking our readers to help us raise $10,000 to fund our year-long journalism initiative called “The Indian Boarding School Project: A Dark Chapter in History.”  Our mission is to shine a light on the dark era of forced assimilation of native American children by the U.S. government and churches.  You’ll be able to read stories each week and join us for Livestream events to understand what the Indian Boarding School era has meant to Native Americans — and what it still means today.

This news will be provided free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts.  Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.