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The film “Red Snow” wins a 2019 LA Skins Fest award. Seen here with the “Best Achievement in Film” award is Tantoo Cardinal (left), who stars in the film, and director Marie Clements (right). (photo courtesy of redsnow.ca)

Los Angeles— Emerging Indigenous movie makers might want to take note that LA Skins Fest, a Native American film festival, has opened its call for its 2020 entries.

The 14th annual festival, which runs Nov. 17-22, is an initiative of the Native American non-profit Barcid Foundation and aims to showcase and champion rising Native filmmakers. The event is presented by Comcast NBCUniversal and held at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Chinese Theater in Hollywood.

Qualified filmmakers can submit their entries through the LA Skins Fest online entry form at laskinsfest.com or through filmfreeway.com. According to a press release, the festival celebrates “filmmakers whose original works are distinguished and offer a new voice in cinema.”

Deadlines to submit are:

Early Deadline: July 31, 2020

Regular Deadline: Aug. 28, 2020

Final Deadline: Sep. 18, 2020

This year, LA Skin Fest awards will be given to the following categories: Achievement in Narrative Filmmaking, Documentary, Narrative Short, Documentary Short, Animation, Writer, Director, Actor, Actress and Audience Award.

The week-long event not only premiers groundbreaking new Indigenous films, it also presents the 9th Annual Native Media Awards Celebration, hosts the 9th Writers Pitch Workshop and hosts Native American filmmakers from throughout North and South America.

Festival organizers said the accepted films are eligible for not only the competition, but also prizes from its corporate sponsors. This year, the festival is partnering with a roster of renowned entertainment brands, including: Walt Disney Studios, Bank of America, San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, Motion Picture Association, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Cast & Crew, Google American Indian Network, STARZ, Sony Pictures Entertainment, and more.

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