fbpx
 

This weekend and next in Indian Country, there’s an abundance of Indigenous arts at markets, festivals and exhibitions. 

The list includes solo exhibitions from two innovative Native artists, as well as celebrated potters, painters and basketmakers showcasing their works in Arizona and California. Plus, there’s a multi-day pottery workshop and the NASP Powwow at the University of Chicago on the calendar.  

Never miss Indian Country’s biggest stories and breaking news. Sign up to get our reporting sent straight to your inbox every weekday morning. 

Here’s our guide to some of the arts, entertainment and culture that’s happening around Indian Country. 

Prescott Indian Market 

When:  Saturday, Sept. 17 & Sunday, Sept. 18

Where:  Sharlot Hall Museum, 415 W. Gurley St., Prescott, AZ 

The open-air museum and heritage site’s Indian Market hosts a juried show of more than 100 native artists showcasing work across a variety of media, including oil painting, beadwork, pottery and weaving. 

The 2022 featured artist is Marilyn Ray, an Acoma Pueblo potter known for her whimsical storytellers and figurines. She creates all her pieces with native Acoma clay that she mines on the Acoma Pueblo, and paints them with natural pigments that she collects throughout the southwest.

Admission is $12 for adults over 18, $5 for members and free for youth under the age of 17. 

Moompetam American Indian Festival 

When: Saturday, Sept. 17 & Sunday, Sept. 18th; 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Where: Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach, CA

The Aquarium of the Pacific hosts the 18th annual Moompetam American Indian Festival, which celebrates indigenous California maritime cultures, including Tongva, Chumash, Acjachemen, Costanoan, Luiseño, and Kumeyaay.  

The celebration features traditional cultural craft demonstrations, storytelling, music, and dance.  As part of this year’s festival, Cindi Alivitre, a descendant of the Tonga, will receive the aquarium’s Heritage Award.  An American Indian studies professor at Cal State Long Beach, Alvitre is also the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) coordinator at the aquarium. 

Admission to the festival is included with general admission to the Aquarium and free to members.   

“On Turtle’s Back: Holly Wilson” exhibit at Pauly Friedman Art Gallery at Misericordia University

When: Through Oct. 11

Where:  301 Lake Street Sandy and Marlene Insalaco Hall, Dallas, TX

Multi-media artist Holly Wilson's arresting solo exhibition features works that convey narratives from her Indigenous heritage. Wilson (Delaware Nation and Cherokee) skillfully marries unsuspecting materials like cast wax, sculpted metal, and logs to create pieces that feel alive with story and history. 

A celebrated and widely exhibited Indigenous artist, she received a  2017 SWAIA Discovery Fellowship from the Santa Fe Indian Market and a 2015 Eiteljorg Fellowship from the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art. 

The gallery is hosting a free presentation by Wilson on Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Monday, Oct. 10, from 5:30 pm-7:00 pm. 

"On Turtle's Back" runs through Oct. 11.

Ishi Glinsky: Upon a Jagged Maze

When: Through Jan. 22, 20223

Where: The Art, Design & Architecture Museum at UC,552 University Rd, Santa Barbara, CA

The first-ever solo exhibition by LA artist Ishi Glinksy (Tohono O’odham) showcases 25 mixed-media works that marry the various Native arts such as jewelry making, basketry and weaving. 

As a sculptor, painter, and installation artist, Glinsky focuses on aspects of resourcefulness, permanence and continuity, based upon his material compositions.

The collection acts as a compelling personal narrative that twists and turns through Glinksy's artistic journey as he seeks to honor Indigenous knowledge with innovative works. 

Let’s Get Fired Up! Traditional Pottery Workshop

When: Saturday, Sept. 24, Sunday, Sept. 25 and Saturday, Oct. 1

Where: Institute for American Indian Studies (AIS)

Led by IAS Director of Collections and AS Education and Traditional Skills Expert Griffen Kalin. This three-day workshop takes participants through making their own clay vessels using traditional techniques. Participants will learn about pottery found in various Indigenous communities across North America.  

Native American Support Program Powwow

When: Saturday, Sept. 17

Where: University of Chicago, 5801 S Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL

For the first time since 2019, the Native American Support Program (NASP) Powwow is back to  celebrate the Indigenous presence on the University of Chicago's campus. 

Featuring Native craft vendors, dancing, drumming and special catering by Native-owned pop-up and catering business Ketapanen Kitchen, the event is held in collaboration with the Chicago Public School Indian Education Program, American Indian Center of Chicago, and the American Indian Health Service of Chicago.

More Stories Like This

New ABC Drama ‘Alaska Daily’ Highlights MMIW Crisis
Here’s What’s Going On in Indian Country: Oct. 7-16
Suspect in Museum of Plains Indian Theft Pleads Guilty
Navajo Artist Partners with Nalgene Water Fund on Water Bottle Design
Actress Sacheen Littlefeather, Who Represented Marlon Brando's Rejection of the Oscar, Has Walked On

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected]