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The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), an agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior, was created by Congress to promote the economic development of American Indian and Alaska Natives (Indian) through the expansion of the Indian arts and crafts market.  One of these programs is the online Source Directory of American Indian and Alaska Native Owned and Operated Arts and Crafts Businesses, which is a great resource for people looking to buy authentic Indian art and for artists interested in a free business listing. 

WHAT IS THE SOURCE DIRECTORY?

There are currently more than 480 businesses listed in the Source Directory. These businesses include Indian arts and crafts cooperatives and Tribal arts and crafts enterprises; businesses and galleries privately owned and operated by individuals, designers, craftspeople, and artists who are enrolled members of federally recognized Tribes; and a few nonprofit organizations, managed by enrolled members of federally recognized Tribes, that develop and market art and craftwork.

Some of the businesses listed in the Source Directory maintain retail shops or open studios; others sell through the Internet, by appointment, or mail order only.  This information is provided in the listing, along with business hours, contact information, major products, website information, mail order, and special services offered.  Businesses are listed alphabetically by State

WHO CAN APPLY FOR A SOURCE DIRECTORY LISTING?

The IACB provides services, including Source Directory listings, to enrolled members of entities on the list published by the Bureau of Indian Affairs under the Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994, 25 U.S.C. § 5130.  Consistent with other statutes defining this Department's responsibilities and obligations to Indian Tribes, the Department interprets the first definition of Indian Tribe as those Tribes listed on the Tribal entities list published in the Federal Register. 

Source Directory applications must include a copy of the Tribal enrollment documentation of the business’s owner or documentation showing that the business is Tribally-owned and operated.  The business must also certify that the majority of the art and craftwork it sells is produced by members of federally recognized Tribes.

The data contained in the Source Directory listings are for general information purposes only.  Business names, contact details, product information, and photography are provided to the IACB by the individual artists and/or organizations.  The Source Directory is regularly updated.

INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS ACT: REPORT A VIOLATION?

While the beauty, quality, and collectability of authentic Indian art and craftwork make each piece a unique reflection of our American heritage, it is important that buyers be aware that fraudulent Indian art and craftwork competes daily with authentic Indian art and craftwork in the nationwide marketplace.  Thus, a top priority of the IACB is the implementation and enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act (IACA) of 1990, as amended, a truth-in-advertising law that provides criminal and civil penalties for marketing products as "Indian-made" when such products are not made by Indians, as defined by the IACA.  If you become aware of any market activity that you believe may be in violation of the IACA, please contact the IACB with the relevant information, such as websites, photographs, suspicious advertising, receipts, business cards, etc.  Complaints may be filed online or by calling its toll free number below.

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

To learn more about the IACB, Source Directory, and its services to the public, please contact us:

Indian Arts and Crafts Board 

U.S. Department of the Interior 

Tel: 1-888-ART-FAKE or 1-888-278-3253 

Web: www.doi.gov/iacb 

Email: [email protected]

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