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 Essential items set to be delivered to Native elders.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The American Indian Graduate Center is contributing $10,000 to create and distribute care packages to tribal elders among local communities with American Indigenous Business Leaders. 

“Our very first teachers are our Elders; they have shared with us their wisdom, and we owe them so much in return,” said Angelique Albert, American Indian Graduate Center Executive Director. “Through this initiative, American Indian Graduate Center is honored to have the opportunity to give back to those who have made such an incredible impact on our lives and the lives of our entire Tribal community.” 

Each care package will include essential items like food, water and cleaning products. Members of American Indigenous Business Leaders and American Indian Graduate Center Scholars and Alumni who are interested in contributing to this initiative should visit AIBL.org. 

“In Tribal communities, younger members have always looked to their elders as sources of respect and leadership – they have an endless amount of admiration for those who came before them and feel a responsibility to care for them,” said Dave Archambault Sr., American Indigenous Business Leaders Board Chairman. 

The contribution by the American Indian Graduate Center is made possible through the Rainer Scholarship Fund, which was established in memory of John Rainer of Taos Pueblo in New Mexico — one of the co-founders of American Indian Graduate Center and its first director. 

“Partnering with American Indigenous Business Leaders for this initiative aligns perfectly with our organization’s core values and the desire of our founder John Rainer to create a positive impact on Indian Country,” Albert said. “Mr. Rainer’s life was dedicated to fighting for Native rights and recipients of these funds are encouraged to use a portion of the money in service to others, just as our organizations are doing now.” 

Learn more about American Indian Graduate Center initiatives at AIGCS.org.

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The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

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