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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Last month, the COVID-19 pandemic forced the organizers of the Gathering of Nations to cancel the 2020 powwow.

Since announcing the cancellation, Gathering of Nations organizers have decided to host a virtual powwow called “Gathering of Nations Virtual Experience.”

The annual Gathering of Nations, the country’s largest powwow, typically brings some 75,000 Native Americans and non-Native people to Albuquerque to watch 3,000 participants who represent over 750 tribes from the United States and Canada.

Official Gathering of Nations merchandise will be available online. Also, the souvenir program magazine will be available to download for free from the Gathering of Nations website. The magazine offers great articles and other information about powwow life.

Viewers will have the opportunity to make donations to other non-profits which are established to assist Native Americans during this pandemic. Information to the donation sites will be posted on the Gathering of Nations website.

According to Gathering of Nations organizers, a recent economic and fiscal impact study conducted by UNM BBER indicates the Gathering of Nations generates $24 million for the city of Albuquerque.

RELATED: America’s Largest Powwow Cancelled

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About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected]