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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — The Navajo Department of Health in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service reported 48 new cases of COVID-19 for the Navajo Nation. The total number of deaths has reached 158 as of Tuesday. 

Preliminary reports from nine health care facilities indicate that approximately 1,585 individuals have recovered from COVID-19, with more reports still pending. The total number of positive COVID-19 cases for the Navajo Nation has reached 4,842.

Navajo Nation cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 1,186
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 503
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 237
  • Gallup Service Unit: 837
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 757
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 785
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 423
  • Winslow Service Unit: 83

*31 residences are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit

During an online town hall on Tuesday, Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer, with IHS Director RADM Michael D. Weahkee and Navajo Area IHS Director Roselyn Tso present, announced the Navajo Nation passed the COVID-19 surge peak in late April, much sooner than initially projected.

IHS Director Michael J. Weahkee met with Navajo Nation leaders on Tuesday.  

Recent data and new surge projections provided by the Navajo Area Indian Health Service on May 24, indicate that the COVID-19 surge peak for IHS hospitalizations, including ICU admissions and ventilations occurred from April 21 to April 26 – an entire month earlier than initial surge projections on March 27.

“We are seeing some very good implications based on new data and new reports from the Navajo Area IHS, but I can’t emphasize enough that we have to remain cautious and diligent in order to continue bringing the numbers down in terms of hospital visits and new cases. Let’s continue to stay home as much as possible, wear protective masks, practice social distancing, and wash our hands as much as possible. We are beating the virus so let’s continue to fight strong and overcome this pandemic together,” President Nez said on Tuesday.

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To Donate to the Navajo Nation

The official webpage for donations to the Navajo Nation, which has further details on how to support  the Nation’s Dikos Ntsaaígíí-19 (COVID-19) efforts is:  http://www.nndoh.org/donate.html.

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For More Information

For more information including reports, helpful prevention tips, and more resources, please visit the Navajo Department of Health’s COVID-19 website at http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19. To contact the main Navajo Health Command Operations Center, please call (928) 871-7014.

For up to date information on impact the coronavirus pandemic is having in the United States and around the world go to: https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/?fbclid=IwAR1vxfcHfMBnmTFm6hBICQcdbV5aRnMimeP3hVYHdlxJtFWdKF80VV8iHgE

For up-to-date information about COVID-19, Native News Online encourages you to go to Indian Health Service’s COVID-19 webpage and review CDC’s COVID-19 webpage. 

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