Tantoo Cardinal (courtesy photo)

OTTAWA, Canada — Acclaimed actress and activist Tantoo Cardinal will be honored at the upcoming Governor General's Performing Arts Awards, a star-studded event happening April 25 at the National Arts Centre.

Other Hollywood celebrities being named laureates are Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool, Green Lantern) and Catherine O'Hara (Home Alone, Schitt’s Creek).

Tantoo, who is currently starring in the ABC series Stumptown, is receiving the 2020 Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award in the “Broadcasting and Film” category. Since 1992, the annual ceremony has spotlighted talented Canadians. Nominees are been picked by the public.

In a brief video message to fans, Cardinal said: “I share this with the people that have inspired me to go into this business and be a part of telling their stories.”

Born in 1950, Cardinal was raised in the rural town of Anzac. After moving on to California and becoming a professional, self-taught actor in the early 1970s, she soon landed roles in a series of big-budget productions, like the Oscar-winning Dances With Wolves (with Kevin Costner and Graham Greene) and Legends of the Fall (with Anthony Hopkins and Brad Pitt), Smoke Signals, among many others.

Her television resume is equally impressive, and comprises roles on Street Legal, Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman, Mohawk Girls, to only name a few.

“I have chosen my path from where I hope to be able to make some change,” Cardinal said on the GGPAA’s website. “It’s tied into what I completely believe in: the stream of life force, and salvaging enough of our stories and ceremonies to start building again. I see it as a responsibility.”

A long roster of other gifted Canadians are also being recognized at the 2020 event, click here for the full list. 

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About The Author
Author: Rich Tupica