World Water Day 2014: Water & Energy are Inter-linked

Chief Caleen Sisk holds up glass of water to demonstrate importance of freshwater.

Chief Caleen Sisk holds up glass of water to demonstrate importance of freshwater.

American Indians have respected the concept water being a key component of life’s sustenance.

NEW YORK — March 22 has been designated as World Water Day 2014. World Water Day is held annually on 22 March as a means of focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.

American Indians have respected the concept water being a key component of life’s sustenance.

Last week, Saturday, March 15, several Native nations should others at the steps of the California State Capitol in Sacramento to protest the ill-effects fracking has on freshwater. Winnemem Wintu Chief Caleen Audrey Sisk was the keynote speaker. She spoke eloquently about how Native nations consider water sacred.

“Here at the Capitol a lot of Brown water planning is going on. This water is our medicine. It comes from the sacred places where the medicine comes from. We struggle to continue to take care of our waters.” Chief Sisk told the crowd of 5,000 protesters.

world water dayThe idea for an international day to celebrate freshwater was recommended at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). The United Nations General Assembly responded by designating March 22, 2014 as the first World Water Day.

The theme of World Water Day 2014 is the inter-linkages between water and energy.

Water and energy are closely interlinked and interdependent. Energy generation and transmission requires utilization of water resources, particularly for hydroelectric, nuclear, and thermal energy sources. Conversely, about 8 percent of the global energy generation is used for pumping, treating and transporting water to various consumers.

Objectives of World Water Day in 2014

  • Raise awareness of the inter-linkages between water and energy
  • Contribute to a policy dialogue that focuses on the broad range of issues related to the nexus of water and energy
  • Demonstrate, through case studies, to decision makers in the energy sector and the water domain that integrated approaches and solutions to water-energy issues can achieve greater economic and social impacts
  • Identify policy formulation and capacity development issues in which the UN system, in particular UN-Water and UN-Energy, can offer significant contributions
  • Identify key stakeholders in the water-energy nexus and actively engaging them in further developing the water-energy linkages
  • Contribute as relevant to the post-2015 discussions in relation to the water-energy nexus.

Photo of Chief Sisk by Nanette Bradley Deetz.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
One Response
  1. sherry cornell 5 years ago
WP2FB Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com