Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Continues to Deal with Onslaught by Law Enforcement

A fire was set by agitators on Saturday night across from camp.

A fire was set by agitators on Saturday night across from camp.

Published October 31, 2016

CANNON BALL, NORTH DAKOTA — As tensions remain high from Thursday’s violent assault from law enforcement, those in camp remain dedicated to ensuring the Dakota Access Pipeline is exposed for its disregard for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s sacred and cultural sites.

As the Oceti Sakowin camp prayed through another weekend, the grassland just north of camp caught on fire early Sunday morning, causing those camped to fear that outside agitators are making their way into camps. Surveillance at camp suggest outside agitators started the fire who escaped driving a white Honda.

“Those who came before us prayed for our existence,” expressed Floris White Bull, member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “To disregard our pleas to consult with and respect our ancestors is beyond hurtful and we will remain committed to honoring our ancestors and culture.”

Tension remain high. Photo by Christopher Francisco

Tension remain high. Photo by Christopher Francisco

With hundreds charged with felonies from Thursday’s events, there is no doubt a significant amount of supporters and their families will be burdened with court appearances throughout North Dakota. As more are released from jail, accounts continue to be confirmed of the mistreatment by law enforcement. Accounts often bring those who are released from jail to tears and frustration.

“Our community is dealing with a tremendous amount of post-traumatic stress,” stated LaDonna Allard, founder of the Sacred Stone Camp. “As information continues to be exposed, we are confident that law enforcement and Dakota Access have violated our human and cultural rights.” 

Supporters call for people to come to the front lines as Dakota Access continues to dig through sacred land.

Camps continue to remain in prayer and ask supporters and allies to call their representatives and remain in prayer as another generation has experience institutional racism and violence by both State and Federal governments. Camps are safe approaching another week of negotiations, prayer and unity.

Darren Thompson (Ojibwe/Tohono O’odham) is a Native American flute player and writer from the Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe Reservation in Northern Wisconsin. He contributes to Native Peoples Magazine, Native News Online and Powwows.com. For more information please visit www.darrenthompson.net

 

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