Journey to the Hopi Nation

October is Domestic Violence Month
John L. Tsosie, background, walks with a group of people as Miss Hopi Auri Roy, left, waits to greet them Tuesday in Kykotsmovi, Arizona. Photo by Donovan Quintero - Navajo Times

John L. Tsosie, background, walks with a group of people as Miss Hopi Auri Roy, left, waits to greet them Tuesday in Kykotsmovi, Arizona.
Photo by Donovan Quintero – Navajo Times

DV walkers defy weather to carry message of healing

Published October 27, 2015

KYKOTSMOVI,  HOPI — While her husband and son walk across the nation building awareness of domestic violence, Loretta A.W. Tsosie can sit back knowing that she built a strong foundation of forgiveness.

Her support shows in the work of her husband Ernest Tsosie Jr. and her son John L. Tsosie, both of whom started walking as part of their “Journey to the Hopi Nation” that began Oct. 14 totaling 104 miles from Window Rock to Kykotsmovi, Arizona – despite extreme weather this year.

Ernie Yazzie Jr., speaks at the Hopi Veterans Memorial Center in Kykotsmovi, Arizona, Yazzie says he’s a recovering alcoholic. Photo by Donovan Quintero - Navajo Times

Ernie Yazzie Jr., speaks at the Hopi Veterans Memorial Center in Kykotsmovi, Arizona, Yazzie says he’s a recovering alcoholic.
Photo by Donovan Quintero – Navajo Times

The pair created Walking the Healing Path Inc. to end domestic violence through annual walks in and around the Navajo Nation. Both men have acknowledged being perpetrators of domestic abuse against women in their lives.

Just as they have at other walks, the two shared their stories with supporters and Hopi tribal members at the end of the walk on Tuesday, October 20, 2015.

Loretta detailed a tradition of feminine strength that she inherited from her lineage.

“It’s matrilineal for the Navajo people,” she said. “My mother was a very strong woman and humble at the same time. She spoke. We listened.”

She said her mother advised her and her siblings not to judge people, even those who hurt them.

“If you don’t forgive them, then it’s going to be you that’s going to be suffering because of all the turmoil in your heart, the dislike, even hatred,” she said.

Editor’s Note: This article first appeared in the Navajo Times. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

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  1. Lena Toledo 2 years ago