Gun Lake Tribe Celebrates Another Successful Harvest

Potawattomi corn was on display showcasing a plentiful harvest

Potawattomi corn was on display showcasing a plentiful harvest

Published October 24, 2015

HOPKINS, MICHIGAN — The Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan, commonly known as the Gun Lake Tribe, celebrated a successful harvest from its tribal garden on Saturday.  The all-day celebration brought together American Indians and others from the Great Lakes region.

The Gun Lake Tribe began its tribal garden in recent years to bring back traditional practices used for centuries by their Pottawatomi ancestors. Some of the crops harvested were the fruition of heirloom seeds that are used from the previous year’s crops.

“It’s really about food sovereignty,” said Kevin Finney, director of the Jijak Foundation that oversees the tribal garden, as part of keeping the traditions of the Tribe alive.

Kevin Finney addresses attendees

Kevin Finney addresses attendees

Chairman D.K. Sprague

Chairman D.K. Sprague

“We are proud of what has been done here to keep our traditions going, “said D.K. Sprague, tribal chairman of the Gun Lake Tribe.

The tribal garden is on the grounds of Camp Jijak, which is located on land-in-trust that is owned by the Gun Lake Tribe.

The Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan’s Camp Jijak is located some 30 miles south of Grand Rapids, where of several of the Tribe’s citizens reside.

Native News Online photos by Levi Rickert

Tribal wigwam housed a duck roasting workshop

Tribal wigwam housed a duck roasting workshop

 

Traditional fire roasts the duck

Traditional fire roasts the duck

 

Sema (tobacco) workshop

Sema (tobacco) workshop

Mobile Farmers Market from the Native Food Channel was on hand

Mobile Farmers Market from nativefoodnetwork.com was on hand

 

Corn workshop

Corn workshop

 

Keeping the fire going

Keeping the fire going

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