Former Executive Director of NCAI Ron Andrade Walks On

Ron Andrade, Executive Director, Los Angeles City/County Native American Indian Commission

Ron Andrade, Executive Director, Los Angeles City/County Native American Indian Commission

Published December 17, 2016

LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles American Indian community, and others in Indian Country, are mourning the loss of Ronald “Ron” Andrade, who walked on December 9, 2016. Andrade was the executive director of the Los Angeles City/County Native American Indian Commission and previously served as the executive director of the National Congress of American Indians. He was 69.

He was a member of the La Jolla Band of Luiseño Indians, where he also served as a member of the tribal council.

Andrade spent his career working on behalf of American Indians.

Between 1980 and 1983, Ron served as the executive director of the National Congress of American Indians, the largest and oldest tribal organization in the country. There, he worked with tribes across Indian Country.

In 1972, he, along with his older brother, Daniel Andrade, started the San Diego Indian Center and began their own consulting firm in 1975. Between 1977 and 1978, Andrade served as the executive director of the San Francisco Indian Center. For a year, in 1984, he served as Staff Assistant to the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs of the California Indian Task Force at the Department of the Interior. From 1986 to 1987, he was an American Indian Affairs Specialist of the Equal Opportunity Office in the Department of Agriculture. In May 1988, Andrade was appointed by President Ronald Reagan as a member of the National Advisory Council on Indian Education.

After these prestigious positions and appointments, Andrade returned to California to begin and finish his career as the executive director of the Los Angeles City/County Native American Indian Commission, where he served for twenty years. There, he helped bring millions of dollars of needed resources into the Los Angeles American Indian community, served as a policy watchdog on issues ranging from Indian child welfare to sacred sites protection issues, and was a passionate and unwavering advocate for the community throughout the state and country.

Andrade was also a veteran, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1965 – 1970 and continued to serve as active duty for the reserves.

Additionally, Andrade was an occasional contributor to Native News Online.

A traditional American Indian burial ceremony began at sundown on Friday, December 17, 2016 and continued until sunrise on Saturday morning.

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