Crop Art Size of 80 Footballs Fields Heartland Message: #NoKXL

A huge crop art image protesting the proposed Keystone XL pipeline covers an 80 acre corn field outstide of Neligh, Nebraska on April 12, 2014. TPhoto by Lou Dematteis

A huge crop art image protesting the proposed Keystone XL pipeline covers an 80 acre corn field outstide of Neligh, Nebraska on April 12, 2014. TPhoto by Lou Dematteis

NELIGH, NEBRASKA — A large crop art image—the size of 80 football field—with the message “HEARTLAND #NoKXL” has been created to send President Barack Obama a message to protect the Heartland by saying no to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. Created by the Cowboy and Indian Alliance, the image art is located in Neligh, Nebraska.

The crop art is directly on the proposed path of Keystone XL, which also crosses the Ponca Trail of Tears.

The crop art image was released today, Sunday, April 12, 2014, as tribal leaders, farmers and ranchers get ready to herd to Washington, D.C. for a week-long series of actions called Reject and Protect. The image was created by artist John Quigley and was inspired by tribal artist Richard Vollaire of the Tongva Nation.

“This land has been in our family for over 100 years. We have always been stewards of the land. The soil is very sandy here, any leak would leach into the Ogallala Aquifer contaminating our water without any concrete plan to clean up the pollution. With this crop art we are literally drawing a line in the sand and asking President Obama to stand with our families,” said Landowner Art Tanderup.

The massive crop design of a cowboy and Indian warrior includes key images of water and a hashtag made of arrows. A sun with seven rays depicts the tribal tradition of protecting seven generations and the renewable energy tribal officials, farmers and ranchers want to see on their land rather than a tarsands pipeline that risks their water.

The crop art image crosses the Ponca Trail of Tears on the proposed route of the proposed KXL pipeline.

The crop art image crosses the Ponca Trail of Tears on the proposed route of the proposed KXL pipeline.

The Keystone XL route crosses the Ponca Trail of Tears without a proper cultural analysis from the state of Nebraska or the U.S. State Department.

“The United States and TransCanada have consistently and intentionally disregarded the concerns of tribal nations and concerned citizens. We as tribal people have been here since the beginning of time and we have seen the best and worst of what people can create. This pipeline is certainly the worst thing that can happen to our land, our water and our people,” commented Aldo Seoane with the Rosebud Sioux Tribe.

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