Cherokee Nation Remembers of Oklahoma City Bombing 20 Years Later with Proclamation

Oklahoma City firefighters preparing to go to work.

Oklahoma City firefighters preparing to go to work.

TAHLEQUAH, OKLAHOMA — Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker signed a proclamation Friday in remembrance of the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.

Sunday marks the twentieth anniversary one of the deadliest domestic terrorism act in United States history.

Chief Baker also issued the following statement:

The April 19, 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was an incredibly dark day for our state. It was a tragedy of epic proportions that sent an entire nation into mourning. The loss of 168 innocent civilians, including 19 precious children, was the result of an evil act we never imagined could happen in Oklahoma. As tragic as that day was, what emerged was a united Oklahoma that showed strength, humanity, courage and resilience. No act of terror could extinguish the indomitable Oklahoma spirit.

On Sunday, the 20th anniversary of that tragedy, we will collectively mourn again, but we will also reflect on our strength as a society to pick ourselves up and pull through anything, despite our broken hearts. I hold the deepest admiration for the courage shown by everyone affected by that day: the survivors, their families, first responders and so many others. So while we grieve with you for those we lost, we also honor you for your strength and resilience.

On behalf of the entire Cherokee Nation, our thoughts and prayers continue to be with each and every one of you. God bless.

 

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  1. Sandi Billington 3 years ago