Cherokee Casino Opens Art Display Featuring a Replica Life-size Cherokee Summer Home

Part of Deep Creek Art Exhibit

Part of Deep Creek Art Exhibit

WEST SILOAM SPRINGS, OKLAHOMA – Whether walking from the 140-room hotel to one of the three popular dining options or en route to a favorite casino game, guests visiting Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs are familiar with the beautiful Cherokee art highlighted throughout the property.

With the addition of a life-size exhibit featuring an artistic representation of Cherokee life prior to the Trail of Tears, Cherokee Casino officials have transformed the already exciting gaming experience into a learning opportunity for visitors to have a snapshot of Cherokee life from long ago.

“We anticipate this unique artistic and educational exhibit will add to the overall experience at West Siloam Springs,” said Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “As leaders in the entertainment and hospitality industry, we are always looking for ways to give our patrons a better and more enjoyable experience. This new historical display will give people a realistic feel for what life was like for our Cherokee ancestors.”

Left to Right: Shawn Slaton, chief executive officer of Cherokee Nation Businesses; Cherokee Nation Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden; Julie Thornton, Miss Cherokee; Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker; Gina Olaya, CNB director of community and tribal relations; Frankie Hargis, Cherokee Nation Tribal Council; and Rusty Stamps, general manager of Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs.

Left to Right: Shawn Slaton, chief executive officer of Cherokee Nation Businesses; Cherokee Nation Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden; Julie Thornton, Miss Cherokee; Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker; Gina Olaya, CNB director of community and tribal relations; Frankie Hargis, Cherokee Nation Tribal Council; and Rusty Stamps, general manager of Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs.

The exhibit, Deep Creek, is named after an actual location in North Carolina where many Cherokee towns and homes once prospered prior to the Indian removal.

The display depicts a scene from the late 1790s to the early 1800s of life in a Cherokee homestead. The mannequins, a husband and wife, were modeled after real-life Cherokees and are shown outside a waddle and daub summer home.

The wife is in 1840s period replica dress, wearing a metal cuff. Her husband is clothed in simulated homespun cotton trousers; blue- and red-striped garters; metal armbands; an ornamental collar, known as a gorget; and a hair feather adornment. Both mannequins are adorned with trade bead necklaces and feather capes authentic to the time period.

The exhibit features a stretched deer hide, woven basket, and waddle and daub summer home. The art pieces featured in the exhibit are the work of several local Cherokee artists. Deep Creek is located between the hotel casino entrance and River Cane Buffet.

In accordance with Cherokee Nation law, 1 percent of the construction costs for new facilities or renovations exceeding $500,000 are set aside for procurement of artwork and artifacts.

Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs is located off U.S. Highway 412 and State Highway 59 in West Siloam Springs.  For more information, visit www.cherokeecasino.com or call (800) 754-4111. All guests must be at least 21 years of age to attend.

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